Afghanistan

Hajji Rais Khan, a white bearded resident of Nangarhar’s Dur Baba district, needed only to remove his false teeth and hand over 3,000 dollars to conclude the swift purchase of a young woman for his bride.

Members of Afghan Young Women for Change staged a protest march in Afghanistan's capital Kabul Saturday, denouncing violence against women, according to AFP photographs.

Some among the group of about 30 women were pictured holding placards that read "Where is justice?"

They took to the streets following the killing of five Afghan women in less than a month in three provinces of the country, AFP said.

The Women Living Under Muslim Laws (WLUML) international solidarity network and Violence is Not Our Culture Campaign (VNC) strongly condemn the imprisonment of women and girls in Afghanistan (approximately 400 of them) for so-called “moral crimes”, including running away from home. The new study released by Human Rights Watch (HRW), “I Had to Run Away”: The Imprisonment of Women and Girls for “Moral Crimes” in Afghanistan[1] documents the phenomenon of these “crimes”, which often involve flight from early forced marriages or domestic violence.

Women Living Under Muslim Laws, the Violence is not our Culture Campaign, and Justice for Iran are pleased to announce the release of a new publication: Mapping Stoning in Muslim Contexts. This report locates where the punishment of stoning is still in practice, either through judicial (codified as law) or extrajudicial (outside the law) methods.   

Afghanistan has been called one of the most dangerous places in the world to be a woman, and much of that danger lies in the home.

According to the United Nations, more than 87 per cent of all women there suffer from domestic violence.

But now, a radical television show is challenging attitudes to this abuse, inviting women to speak candidly and anonymously about their problems at home.

From Kabul, Tahir Qadiry reports.

Please go to the BBC link below to see the video report.

Sami Madhi, un Afghan de 27 ans, a décidé que les choses devaient changer dans son pays. Il a créé une émission de télévision où les femmes peuvent parler en toute liberté de la violence dont elles sont victimes: de leur mari qui les frappe, de leur père qui les marie à l'âge de 10 ans ou du silence de la société qui ne fait rien pour les aider. L'émission fait fureur. Au moment où le procès Shafia se déroule à Kingston, notre journaliste Michèle Ouimet et notre photographe Ivanoh Demers se sont rendus à Kaboul.

Afghan President Hamid Karzai has ordered the release of an Afghan woman imprisoned for adultery after a relative raped her. The move comes after Afghan judicial authorities met to consider the case and proposed a pardon for her on Thursday. CNN is identifying her only as Gulnaz to protect her identity.

Women Living Under Muslim Laws welcomes the recent decision to include women delegates in the Afghan delegation to Bonn: 13 women will now attend and participate in this meeting.

An Afghan woman jailed for adultery after she was raped by a relative is set to be freed – but only after agreeing to marry the man who attacked her. The case, which has highlighted the plight of Afghan women jailed for so-called moral crimes, was to be the subject of a documentary film funded by the European Union – until diplomats censored it out of fear for the woman's welfare, and for their relations with the Afghan government.

In wake of the exclusion of Afghan women from the ‘peace process’ at the Bonn Conference taking place on the 5th of December 2011,

WLUML vigorously denounces:

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