Afghanistan

Sami Madhi, un Afghan de 27 ans, a décidé que les choses devaient changer dans son pays. Il a créé une émission de télévision où les femmes peuvent parler en toute liberté de la violence dont elles sont victimes: de leur mari qui les frappe, de leur père qui les marie à l'âge de 10 ans ou du silence de la société qui ne fait rien pour les aider. L'émission fait fureur. Au moment où le procès Shafia se déroule à Kingston, notre journaliste Michèle Ouimet et notre photographe Ivanoh Demers se sont rendus à Kaboul.

Afghan President Hamid Karzai has ordered the release of an Afghan woman imprisoned for adultery after a relative raped her. The move comes after Afghan judicial authorities met to consider the case and proposed a pardon for her on Thursday. CNN is identifying her only as Gulnaz to protect her identity.

Women Living Under Muslim Laws welcomes the recent decision to include women delegates in the Afghan delegation to Bonn: 13 women will now attend and participate in this meeting.

An Afghan woman jailed for adultery after she was raped by a relative is set to be freed – but only after agreeing to marry the man who attacked her. The case, which has highlighted the plight of Afghan women jailed for so-called moral crimes, was to be the subject of a documentary film funded by the European Union – until diplomats censored it out of fear for the woman's welfare, and for their relations with the Afghan government.

In wake of the exclusion of Afghan women from the ‘peace process’ at the Bonn Conference taking place on the 5th of December 2011,

WLUML vigorously denounces:

A group of armed men have stoned and shot dead a woman and her daughter in Afghanistan's Ghazni province, security officials have told the BBC. The officials blamed the Taliban, who they said had accused the women of "moral deviation and adultery". The police said two men had been arrested in connection with the murder.

The attack was only 300m from the governor's office in Ghazni city, which is on a list of places to be transferred to Afghan security control.

Taliban grip

This paper reflects the perspectives and recommendations of Afghan women who have participated in a series of meetings, roundtables and workshops organized by Afghan Women’s Network (AWN). The following overview of consultation outcomes and recommendations presents how women see their future and the future of Afghanistan thru 2014 and beyond.

Women's rights in Afghanistan are once again under threat after 10 years of progress, two leading British aid agencies have said.

Oxfam and Action Aid said on Monday many Afghan women were worried that the impending international troop withdrawal, coupled with an on-going effort to secure a political deal with the Taliban, could undermine their future.

In Afghanistan, women's groups are claiming a rare victory. Last winter, the government was planning to bring battered women's shelters under government control.

Women's rights advocates sprang into action, complaining that the new rules would turn shelters into virtual prisons for women who had run away from home because of abuse. But after a flurry of media attention, the Afghan government agreed to re-examine the issue. And this month, President Hamid Karzai's Cabinet quietly approved a new draft that has support from women's groups.

The objectives of this project were:

  1. To ascertain the nature and extent of sexual harassment and gender discrimination in the Ministries of the GoA by means of a questionnaire to be completed anonymously by a sampling of male and female employees of representative Ministries, and
  2. To develop a workshop to educate staff in Ministries regarding sexual harassment and discrimination of women. 

Main Strategies:

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