Iran

Presentation from the Asia Pacific NGO Forum of Beijing +10.
Iran's morality police have made several raids in Tehran, in an apparent crackdown on women who flout the strict Islamic dress code.
Iran's new parliament, sworn in two weeks ago, has nine female legislators, down from 13 in the previous body. Women throughout the country are watching this mix of mostly conservative legislators' approach to women's rights.
Iran's reformist Parliament passed a bill Monday granting women the same inheritance rights as men, a move that sets the stage for a showdown with the conservative 12-member Guardian Council, Reuters reported yesterday.
The Women's Cultural Center (WCC) along with several other women organizations and groups helped arrange a gathering for those who wished to express their disgust or dismay towards policies for the projection of women’s role on Iran’s National TV.
A gathering to celebrate International Women's Day in Tehran turned ugly as militia groups broke up what had started as a peaceful demonstration.
Iranian women have won the right to have custody of boys up to the age of seven, giving divorced mothers the same rights over their sons as they do over their daughters.
Most of these studies, including writings by this author, have adopted a broad historical, political, or sociological lens through which gender relations and the concerns of women of the region have been analyzed. In this article on Islamist women of Iran, however, I wish to adopt a somewhat different perspective. I am not looking at rank-and-file women who, willingly or not, acquiesced to the Islamist movement after the 1979 Revolution.
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