Bahrain

The Islamic Sharia, in so far as it is interpreted and exploited as the principal source of legislation in Bahrain, has a negative impact on women's rights and dignity in the private sphere. With regards to the public sphere, women are entitled to participate in public affairs and enjoy political rights including the rights to vote and to stand for elections.

For the first time, feminists in Bahrain are seeking new Islamic perspectives on gender and women's empowerment, and asking for modern interpretations of the Quran.
Internet and mobile phones have spawned a new kind of marriage in the Gulf.
The agony of more than 2,000 families here with stateless children might be over soon with the decision of a state-run organisation to push for equal 
nationality rights for women and men.
Getting a divorce and custody of one’s children is very difficult in Bahrain, even in cases where a husband sexually attacks his wife.
Reporters Without Borders is concerned about freedom of expression in Bahrain. In the past couple of months, two journalists have been charged because of what they wrote and the information ministry has stepped up Internet filtering.
Reporters sans frontières s’inquiète pour la situation de la liberté d’expression. En 2 mois, deux journalistes ont été poursuivis en raison de la publication de leurs articles et le ministère de l’Information a élargi sa campagne de filtrage d’Internet.
Lawmakers from the largest opposition bloc in the Bahraini Parliament are opposing setting the minimum marriage age for girls at 15, saying this is against Islamic principles.
The percentage of Shiite representatives in the country's institutions is on the decline. In the year 2003 the figure was 18%; it now stands at 13%.
Front Line est profondément préoccupée suite à la campagne de harcèlement présumée contre la défenseuse des droits humains Ghada Jamsheer, présidente du Women's Petition Committee (WPC).
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