Violence against women

The Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission (AIHRC) “has been until now”, said Navi Pillay, the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (UNHCHR), “a critical, credible institution.” That ‘until now’ is significant: Pillay was visiting Afghanistan partly to discuss the risk to the Commission of losing its ‘A status’ when it comes up for international accreditation in November. The problem is the flawed way new commissioners were appointed earlier this year. Pillay said she had received no assurances from President Karzai that he might revisit those appointments. AAN’s Sari Kouvo and Kate Clark report.

The Association for Women’s Rights in Development (AWID), the Violence is Not our Culture Campaign (VNC), and the Women Living under Muslim Laws international solidarity network (WLUML) strongly condemn the killing of Indian writer and activist Sushmita Banerjee outside her home in Paktika Province, Afghanistan.

Public Statement

A call for solidarity with Amria Osman and women living in Sudan under the terror of Sudan Public Order Regime

Asian girls are the hidden victims of child grooming gangs, dipping under the radar of police or social services, according to a report released on Tuesday.

Four men have been convicted for their roles in the gang-rape and murder of a young woman in a moving bus in Delhi last year.

An eight year old died of sexual injuries on her wedding night with her 40 year old husband in Yemen. 

DHAKA, 5 September 2013 (IRIN) - Women living in the slums in Dhaka, Bangladesh’s capital of 15 million people, face a higher risk of domestic violence than women in other parts of the country, say researchers. 

Nationwide, recordkeeping and data collection on the extent and types of violence against women are still scarce, according to an expert panel in 2011monitoring the country’s progress on eliminating violence against women. But the UN Special Rapporteur on Violence against Women, Rashida Manjoo, found ample evidence in a recent visit to Bangladesh that “discrimination and violence against women continues in law and practice”. 

Crimes & Impunity: A pioneering report on sexual torture in Iranian Prisons

On 10 December 2012 Justice for Iran launched the first-ever comprehensive report on sexual violence and torture in Iranian prisons. 

This weighty report based on testimonials of victims, survivors, witnesses and experts, examines the extent to which women prisoners are systematically subjected to sexual violence as a gender-specific means of silencing young Iranian girls and women dissidents.

The report will mark International Human Rights Day on 10 December. The first of three reports, Crimes & Impunity is based on historical, empirical and anecdotal facts regarding crimes committed by Iranian prison authorities during the first decade after the establishment of the Islamic Republic in Iran. “With the launch of this report, we hope to not only end the cycle of violence and silence in Iran, but also highlight the fact that if in accordance with statements of Iranian authorities torture does not exist in Iranian prisons, then they are responsible to stand by their word and bring to justice those official elements who have committed and continue to commit such illegal and criminal acts,” said Shadi Sadr, the Director of Justice for Iran project.

كتب محامي أحد معتقلي مظاهرات "برافر لن يمر" ضد مخطط إسرائيل لتهجير أكثر من خمسين ألف فلسطيني في النقب، والتي جرت في الخامس عشر من تمّوز؛ على حسابه على موقع التواصل الإجتماعي "فيسبوك"، أنه عندما دخل إلى مقرّ الشرطة الإسرائيليّة ليسأل عن موكّلهِ، بعد أن تم القبض عليه خلال النشاطات السلميّة التي عمّت أنحاء فلسطين لمنع المُخطّط، أعرب له الضابط المُحقِق، عن قلقه حيال هذه المظاهرات. حيثُ أن الشرطة - وأجهزة الأمن الإسرائيليّة عامة- تُواجه جيلاً جديداً من الشباب، مُسيّساً، متعلماً وأكثر وعيّاً.

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