Violence against women

On June 3, the day that the Elections Commission announced the victory of ‘Abd al-Fattah al-Sisi in Egypt’s presidential race, television announcer Radwa Ruhayyim covered the festivities in Tahrir Square. Surrounded by ululating revelers, she noted that, amidst the celebrations, several women had been assaulted. [1] Live coverage of the June 8 inauguration festivities also included references to assaults that day. Tragically, the story of mass sexual assaults at large political gatherings is nothing new. Between November 2012 and August 2013, over 200 women were assaulted at political events including celebrations of the second anniversary of the January 25 uprising against Husni Mubarak and protests against President Muhammad Mursi in 2012 and 2013. The women were surrounded by large groups of men who tore their clothes, groped their bodies and penetrated them with their fingers or, in some cases, with bladed instruments. Some women were so badly injured that their hymens were torn and their reproductive organs permanently damaged.

Devant l’absence de justice et le règne de l’impunité, les voix des morts reviennent habiter le silence de l’oubli pour réclamer un souvenir, une pensée ou la convocation d’une mémoire cisaillée, amputée et cachée.

The failure to tackle female genital mutilation (FGM) is a "national scandal" with as many as 170,000 victims in the UK, MPs have said.

After Egypt increased the legal age for marriage to 18 years in 2008, policy makers expected to see a decline in the number of early marriages. But, according to new research presented at a seminar at The American University of Cairo this week, the country must overcome significant economic, social, and cultural barriers before child marriage becomes a thing of the past.

Indonesia is an archipelago country with 240 million people spread in more than 13,000 islands, living in 3 time zones, with 34 provinces and hundreds of districts/cities. It is one of the largest social media users especially among youth, not only middle-class, but also grass-roots particularly migrant workers. Known as a prominent organization founded by young women’s activists, which have been working for almost two decades, the Institute understands that combating human trafficking in a majority Muslim population country (with Christian, Catholic, Budhist, and Hindu least than 9 percent of population) will touch sensitive issues such as moral, cultural, and religious, not to mention patriarchal mindset from the government officials, parliament members, and also media, making the efforts face strong resistances and difficulties, and even threats. Some of NGOs released monitoring report on conflict showing conflict is still remains as problem. West Java is one of the highest rank province potentially effect by conflict.

At 32, Nalluri Poshani looks like an old woman. Squatting on the floor amidst piles of tobacco and tree leaves that she expertly transforms into beedis, a local cigarette, she tells IPS, I feel dizzy. The tobacco gives me headaches and nausea.

Libyan human rights activist and lawyer Salwa Bugaighis, who played an active part in country’s 2011 uprising, was shot dead by unknown assailants in the eastern city of Benghazi late Wednesday.

UN Human Rights Council, 26th Session
High Level Panel on Preventing and Eliminating Child, Early and Forced Marriage
23 June 2014

The wall of missing girls around the Falomo Roundabout under the Falomo Bridge in  Lagos had become significant in the crusade for the search for our missing girls. On May  8th at the roundabout, Women For Peace and Justice Bring Back our Girls Lagos after  obtaining the required permission, had carefully placed placards with the profiles and  names of 176 Chibok girls that that had been verified by CAN. The placards were  evidence that 200+ girls were missing and were a symbol of our commitment to bring  back our girls, the shared pain of the Chibok parents and the love of our nation.

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