India

Daughters of Fire, the India Court of Women on Dowry and Related Forms of Violence was held from July 26 -29, 2009 at Christ University, Bangalore. Organised by Vimochana and AWHRC India in partnership with forty women and human rights groups from different parts of the country and in collaboration with several local organisations and institutions the Court sought to open up new political spaces in civil society that would help us to bring the phenomena of dowry violence that has been made invisible, normal and routine back to the centre of public consciousness and conscience.

‘Give peace a chance’ may just be another cliché for many, but for women who have suffered the ravages of war, endless strife and other forms of conflict, joining hands to find meaningful solutions to their collective aspiration lends it a whole new meaning. "For 5,000 years women have been sitting in ‘jirgas’ (tribal councils), at least in Afghanistan. We have ‘jirgas’ all over Pakistan’s tribal areas also, and we thought why not introduce this concept?"

On 4 and 5 August 2009, human rights defenders were detained by police in Manipur following a protest against the summary execution of an unarmed former militant by security forces.
A five-year-old girl was beheaded by a neighbour who believed her 'sacrifice' would help him and his wife conceive a son.
India's National Commission for Women wants Madhya Pradesh state to explain why hundreds of would-be brides reportedly underwent virginity tests.
Dowry deaths or sex selection resulting in the termination of female fetuses, are but two most extreme manifestations of the phenomena of violence against women that is taking new and more contemporary forms.
La Haute cour a jugé que les rapports sexuels entre adultes de même sexe ne devaient plus être considérés comme un crime.
An Indian court ruled gay sex was not a crime, a verdict that will bolster demands by gay and health groups that the government scrap a British colonial law, which bans homosexual sex.
The Indian government is reviewing legislation that outlaws homosexuality.
A group of around 30 women began a fast unto death, on 13 April, to demand the cessation of hostilities in Sri Lanka.
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