Iran

Currently, in Iran, there are nine women sentenced to death by stoning on charges of adultery, compared to two men for the same offence -- highlighting the fact that this barbaric mode of execution is primarily a women's issue.
The Minister of Justice and spokesman for the Judiciary, Mr. Jamal Karimi-Rad, is the first Iranian judicial authority who has made official remarks in reaction to the Stop Stoning Forever campaign. In a press conference held on November 21, 2006, he denied that stoning is practiced as a punishment in Iran.
Police dispersed the protesters who were calling for a ban on polygamy, equal child custody rights, and within marriage, freedom for women to work where they please and to travel freely.
WLUML supports, and urges you to support, this campaign with the objective of changing the Islamic Penal Code of Iran so that stoning will never again be issued as a sentence or practiced as a punishment.
It was reported late in September 2006 that for the first time in Iranian history an unprecedented law had been passed in the parliament to "offer" Iranian citizenship to children born to Iranian mothers and non-Iranian fathers.
Iran's parliament passed a law on Sunday allowing children with an Iranian mother and a foreign father to acquire Iranian nationality, the official IRNA news agency reported.
Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, Iran's outspoken president, fired an ominous warning at the country's educated elites yesterday by calling for a purge of "liberal and secular" academics in the universities.
This 2001 documentary by Kim Longinotto is about women and divorce in Iran set in a family law court in Tehran. It focuses on several cases of women trying to divorce their husbands and can now be viewed online.
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