Women In Black held a vigil on the 3rd September 2015 drawing attention to the UK government’s complicity in human rights abuses in Sudan, and abuses against women in particular.


Position statement given by Muslim for Progressive Values regarding the way anti-apostasy and anti-blasphemy laws  are used to authorize state actors to discriminate religious or ethnic minorities providing justification for violence and hate.


Beyond Trousers reveals Sudan's public order regime to promote derogative concept of women and prevent them from executing their economic, political and human rights. It provides an an analysis within the legal and religious context how the Public Order Regime undermines Sudan's capacity to fulfill its obligations under the African Charter and in human rights perspectives mainly for women.


In  this Report, the Special Rapporteur on violence against women, its causes and consequences, provides an overview of the legally binding provisions, implementing mechanisms and relevant jurisprudence regarding violence against women in three regional human rights systems: the African, European and Inter-American systems.

 Please download the pdf to read the full paper.


The Special Rapporteur on violence against women, Rashida Manjoo, discusses the existing legal standards and practices regarding violence against women in three regional human rights systems: the African, European and Inter-American systems. The Addendum to the Report also shade lights on the normative gap in international law as regards violence against women.

 Please download the pdf to read the full paper.

In February this year, Sudan made amendments to its controversial Shari’a-based penal code which included changes to the law pertaining to the crime of rape.

Rashida Manjoo, United Nations Special Rapporteur on violence against women, conducted an official visit to Sudan, invited by the Government, to analyse the  causes and consequences of VAW across the Country. She observed that violence against women is an issue of concern in Sudan despite the existence of programme, policies and laws. Reports and interviews refer to the existence of violence in the family and the community, including against women and girl children, whether physical, psychological, sexual or economic.


All over the world, diverse groups use arguments based on anti-rights interpretations of religion, culture and tradition to justify violence and discrimination. This publication from AWID highlights agreements that affirm the universal and interconnected nature of human rights. It can be used by human rights advocates to challenge state and non-state actors attempting to block the development, progress and protection of laws at all levels.

To read the publication please download the pdf.